The Interview

theater

 

I watched “The Interview” after attending a friend’s Christmas celebration last night and was pleasantly surprised. Without giving away any plot twists, I write in praise of the movie as a whole.

The media has been bombarded by movie critics who largely panned the film, but if you take it for what it is, a not-too-serious diversion, it does a pretty good job.

The media has been bombarded by movie critics who largely panned the film, but if you take it for what it is, a not-too-serious diversion, it does a pretty good job. It’s not too long; it keeps going; and it is mildly amusing. The actors do a good job, and the movie is well written.

Of course, the movie has been thrust into the middle of an international crisis about cyber attacks by the real North Korea and has engendered multiple comments by the President as well. Sony has done an abysmal job of reacting to all these events, but their simultaneous theater and online releases should help it to recoup at least some profits from the venture.

The wrapping of the movie in a banner of free speech, and a refusal to let outside powers determine what we can and cannot see in our own movie theaters, has helped the movie’s fortunes without a doubt. There’s nothing like telling someone they can’t see something to make them want to see it all the more.

So while “The Interview” may not be “Gone with the Wind,” it is an amusing way to spend two hours and even more so to defend freedom of speech.