Catholic Church and Climate Change

When even the Pope is speaking out against your policy, it can get very lonely out there.

It’s hard for a Catholic to go up against the Pope, and that’s why conservatives in the U.S. Congress are so upset about Pope Francis and his support of a climate change treaty during the upcoming negotiations in Paris. These conservatives are probably the last governmental group in the world to reject the wisdom of scientific measurements, not to mention the disappearing glaciers in our polar regions. And even these conservatives feel obliged to admit that “they are not scientists” when prefacing remarks on this subject.

Now, however, Pope Francis will be preparing an encyclical about stewardship of the environment, and he has met with key climate change experts in advance. And, in a particularly ironic twist, he has been invited by John Boehner to address the Congress when he will certainly address the subject.

The Pope’s leadership on this topic will have even more influence in Latin American countries, now expressing a willingness to join with the rest of the world with their own sacrifices. U.S. conservatives will find themselves completely isolated from the rest of the world in their denial of climate change science. They are already starting to say that the Pope has been “misled” by climate change scientists.

At this point, it’s hard to say what could possibly make conservatives change their mind. When even the Pope is speaking out against your policy, it can get very lonely out there.