Fiorina’s Questionable Past

life-history

Carly Fiorina is bathing in the adulation of her fans now, in light of an impressive performance in the second Republican Presidential debate. But we should expect her improved position in the polls to be short-lived if the realities of her past trickle down to the voters.

Indeed, Carly will find her time in the spotlight short, and she will be just one more individual holding the role of main challenger to Donald Trump, who will remain at the top through the Republican convention.

Fiorina stakes her reputation on her tenure as CEO of Hewlett-Packard, a disastrous stint with any fair reading of the economic indicators. While some statistics are positive, these invariably result from the increased volume of business after the merger with Compaq. Fiorina’s attempt to explain the decline of the company’s share price — it plummeted 40 percent — rely on her depiction of the dot.com crisis, but she fails to mention that her competitors in the technology industry fared much better.

At the end, she was viciously fired from her position; she wasn’t just let go; she was expelled. And in retribution, she took a golden parachute of compensation including a massive pension arrangement. In fact, Carly seems to rely on each failure to climb to a new level of ineptitude. What makes her think that losing a race for the Senate qualifies her to run for President? A more humble approach would involve running for a lesser office, not a greater one.

Indeed, Carly will find her time in the spotlight short, and she will be just one more individual holding the role of main challenger to Donald Trump, who will remain at the top through the Republican convention.